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NEWS OF GALAPAGOS NATIONAL
PARK DIRECTORADE


Press release
PR.RPU. P001.R01 - 2012-06-06 - No. 39
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Santa Cruz live a migration of small marine iguanas

Individuals of this species emerged of his shell and seeking suitable locations for feeding, rest and protection.



The Galapagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) measured 10 cm (length) when they hatch.



The presence of dozens of marine iguanas has attracted the attention of domestic and foreign tourists and inhabitants of Santa Cruz, who have witnessed the migration process following individuals of this species recently hatched in Punta Nuñez and other nesting sites, in a headlong rush toward the southwest, looking for a place with better conditions for their feeding, rest and protection.

The process of marine iguanas mating takes place between February and March, females dig nests and lay two to three eggs once a year, they will hatch between May and June.

After hatching, the iguanas weighing between 40 and 70 grams, measure about 10 cm (body length) and can not swim until age two years. 95% of individuals migrate south in search ravines and cliffs with reefs, which provide space for them to regulate their body temperature and feeding facilities. It has been found that can travel up to 3 Km in two days.

Because on their way to the southwest iguanas crossing the town of Puerto Ayora, the Galapagos National Park Service (GNPS) has called on the community to have extreme caution when transiting through the streets near the coast. The authority has also requested the assistance for vehicles circulate lower speeds in areas where it has often been small iguanas.

The Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), is considered vulnerable in the UICN Red List. The main predators are introduced rats, cats and dogs.

This is the only reptile in the world that can last up to 45 minutes under the sea. Marine iguanas inhabiting smallest in Genovesa Island and the largest are on Fernandina and Isabela.




Prepared by Galapagos National ParkPublic Relations Process
For more information, email as at: info@dpng.gob.ec





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